Raw Coconut Yogurt – Dairy-Free

Raw Coconut Yogurt | Real Food Kosher

Make your own dairy free yogurt using young coconut meat with just three ingredients. The coconut meat cultures overnight on your counter with a good quality powdered probiotic.

Young coconut meat is different than the fibrous tough interior of a regular coconut. Young coconuts, or immature coconuts have a hard green shell with a soft white husk and softer coconut meat interior. They are also very perishable, so buying frozen young coconut meat is not only convenient but probably preserves more nutrients (unless you happen to have them growing in your backyard).

Please note that unlike regular yogurt, young coconut meat has very little protein. I would eat this more as a treat or healthy dessert. Once in a while I would make this a light breakfast with some grain-free granola for more protein.

There are many coconut yogurt recipes using coconut milk as its base. Most of them use gelatin and I haven’t done much research on good kosher sources for gelatin (please leave a comment if you use kosher gelatin) so haven’t explored that option yet.

Coconut Yogurt Ingredients

For comparison’s sake – take a look at the ingredient list for a store bought “plain” coconut milk yogurt:

ORGANIC COCONUT MILK (ORGANIC COCONUT CREAM, WATER, GUAR GUM, XANTHAN GUM), ORGANIC EVAPORATED CANE JUICE, PECTIN, CHICORY ROOT EXTRACT (INULIN), TAPIOCA DEXTROSE, ALGIN (KELP EXTRACT), MAGNESIUM PHOSPHATE, TRICALCIUM PHOSPHATE, ORGANIC RICE STARCH, LOCUST BEAN GUM, LIVE CULTURES, CARRAGEENAN, DIPOTASSIUM PHOSPHATE, VITAMIN B12.

raw coconut yogurt

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Raw Coconut Yogurt | Real Food Kosher

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Comments

  1. Prag says

    I didn’t even know coconut meat existed, and know everything about coconut (oil, fresh, shreded, cream, mil)I hope i’ll find this is one of the health stores around.

  2. says

    Wow! I had no idea that coconut flesh is available in packages. That photo with the blueberries looks amazingly delicious. When I make coconut kefir I usually use Angie’s recipe from Groovy Gourmet. There’s a recipe video I can watch while I make it, and like your yogurt it’s healthy. Gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, paleo, raw food, grain free and vegan. Nice! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=disq2AQTy-Y

  3. Leah says

    Where did you find pareve probiotic? I can’t find any. I have several recipes calling for yogurt, this would be great to make.

    • lisa says

      Many of the raw food and vegan sites sell non-dairy probiotics. If you need a kosher certified one, kosher vitamins.com has one that is non-dairy.

  4. sarena says

    this looks great! Wish I could get that coconut meat locally. ANd yes, which probiotics do you use that are parve?
    For consumption I use the Dr Ohiras professional formula.

    • lisa says

      Great question! I always make a new batch with probiotic capsules since I don’t eat it all the time. I’m not sure if you can, I need to research this.
      If you stumble on any answers please let me know!

  5. says

    Just wondering where you buy your coconut meat. I bought the brand above at Whole Foods and paid an arm and a leg, though it tasted heavenly. It just doesn’t taste the same with canned coconut milk so would love to find a better source. Thanks for a great, easy recipe!

    • says

      It is very expensive, I am looking for better prices. Some of the local health food store in LA had them a little bit cheaper but not by much. This is one reason why I don’t make it that often. I haven’t seen other brands or online sources for this.
      The other option would be to buy young coconuts and scoop the meat out yourself – you might need about 4 to get the same amount and not sure what the price difference would be.

      If I come across a more affordable option I will let you know.

    • lisa says

      I’ve never tried it with coconut milk powder. I also haven’t made it yet with canned coconut milk but I know many people do it that way – but they will add gelatin or another ingredient to make it thick.

      Most probiotic supplements come in capsules that you can easily open to get the powder out.

  6. Michelle says

    Hi, I was just wondering whether the 2 cups of coconut meat is referring to meat that is blended? I decided to try it out with 1 package of creamed coconut and 2 Bio-Kult capsules. Didn’t add any water. It’s in the oven now.. My daughter cannot wait!

  7. Heather says

    After seeing your recipe, I made a special trip to Whole Foods. I had no idea that they had frozen, organic young coconut meat! :-) :-) :-) :-) I currently have the mixture in my yogurt maker ( leftover from before cutting dairy/gluten/etc). I’ll check it in about 8 hours, but I’m hopeful. The texture/consistency is great.

    As a side note, I use Great Lakes Kosher Unflavored Beef Gelatin. (Supposedly grass-fed) It’s available on Amazon.

    • Lisa Rose says

      I’m sure it will come out great!

      I’ve read great things about the Great Lakes gelatin. Every community has different standards for kosher food and I know many that are using it, but there doesn’t seem to be a consensus on its kashrut status so I don’t feel comfortable recommending it yet.

  8. Kristin says

    I’m also using Great Lakes. If you do find out an update on its kashrut status, or on a better source of gelatin, please let us know!

  9. Kristin says

    I just went to the Great Lakes website and they have their kosher certificate posted: http://www.greatlakesgelatin.com/business/docs/KosherCert2013.pdf
    An Amazon reviewer commented: “I know with some other things like rennet the thought process is that it’s been processed to a point where it’s no longer considered meat….From the certificate it appears to be parve, not fleischic, so I believe it would fall into the ‘no longer meat’ category.”
    Hope that info is helpful; I know different communities have different standards.

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